• Press for Perugia Press!

    As I take over as director and editor of Perugia Press this month, we are getting a flurry of coverage about the history of the press, this leadership change, and the events we’ve planned to celebrate our 20th anniversary. We were featured generously in our local newspaper, The Daily Hampshire Gazette. Founding director Susan Kan and I had a guest blog up at the Straw Dog Writers Guild  website. Carrie Healy of NEPR conducted a lovely interview with founding director Susan Kan, and on Election Day we talked about poetry and championing women’s voices on NPR (“Northampton Poetry Radio”) on WHMP (our segment aired from 37:35-47:15). Hope to see you for the upcoming festivities!  

  • I have three new poems up at The Dandelion Review!

    I’m excited to share that I have three new poems published in the inaugural issue of The Dandelion Review! The issue also features a student at the university where I teach, my friend and fellow writer Joyce Hayden, and a host of other talented writers. Congrats to Sarah Sandman on launching this biannual literary magazine publishing poetry and creative nonfiction and seeking to publish women writers and gender nonconforming writers. You can read my pieces in the “Poems” tab of my website, and you can check out the whole issue live at: https://thedandelionreview.com/the-dandelion-review-issues/. The magazine can also be purchased as a hard copy through this link: http://www.lulu.com/shop/sarah-sandman/the-dandelion-review/paperback/product-22902468.html

  • My review of Martha Collins’s Admit One just published in Solstice!

    I’m happy to have a review I wrote just published this week online in Solstice Literary Magazine. I really recommend reading Martha Collins’s important, intense, and interesting collection Admit One: An American Scrapbook. I’d go so far as to say it makes a necessary contribution to our continuing national conversation about racism, power, immigration, women’s bodies, black bodies, mental illness, belonging, othering, power, and privilege. 

  • Perugia Press News!

    Later this year I will be taking on the role of editor/director of Perugia Press, a small nonprofit press founded in 1997 by the incomparable Susan Kan. Perugia is a feminist venture, publishing one book of poetry a year by a woman at the beginning of her publishing career. The manuscript is chosen from the entries to our nationwide annual contest. After working with the press for six years as a board member, manuscript reader, and finalist judge, I’m honored to continue our mission of bringing the work of the best new women poets to light. Check out Perugia’s website and Facebook page for info on the history of the press, our authors and their books, our contest…

  • I’m holding workshops at Mass Poetry’s Student Day of Poetry

    On Friday, December 18, Mass Poetry is sponsoring a Student Day of Poetry at UMass Amherst for middle and high school students. Throughout the day, students can engage in generative writing workshops with top poets and educators, enjoy poetry readings, performances, and participate in a student open mic. Featured poets include Martín Espada, Regie Gibson, and Aja Monet. I’m offering two “Exploring Ekphrasis” workshops. For more information, visit the Mass Poetry site: http://www.masspoetry.org/umasdop or email info@masspoetry.org.

  • “30 Poems in November!” Reading

    I’m reading at Smith College as part of the celebration to commemorate the seventh year of writing a poem a day to benefit the Center for New Americans literacy programs for immigrants and refugees in Northampton. The reading takes place in Wright Hall at Smith College on Tuesday, December 8 at 7:00 pm. Come join us!

  • My poem was chosen for the Northampton Arts Council’s Biennial Poetry Reading!

    My poem “Alita Darcy” has been chosen for inclusion in the Northampton Arts Council’s inaugural Biennial Poetry Reading based on the theme “Motion/Emotion” and accompanied by a juried art exhibit on the theme. Judges Patrick Donnelly, Susan Kan, and Christopher Gonzalez selected 12 winning poems from over 150 submissions from 53 poets. Artistic responses to the “Motion-Emotion” theme were to revolve around the central idea of a quote by William Faulkner: The aim of every artist is to arrest motion, which is life, by artificial means and hold it fixed so that 100 years later, when a stranger looks at it, it moves again since it is life. Join us for a reading at…